40 Things to Live Without to Have a More Minimal Lifestyle 359

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I’m thinking more and more about the so-called abundance in our lives. It does exist, but we tend to notice the wrong side of it.

What I mean is that we want to have more when it comes down to food, belongings, money, technologies, information, entertainment and so on.

And the moment we use or consume the certain thing, we feel good. But right after that, we feel emptier than before.

It’s because this stuff actually sucks the life out of us.

The food we eat is killing us. We don’t eat for energy or health anymore, but because it tastes good. And we barely think about the fact that probably 2/3 of the food in every supermarket is processed and made only to get us fat, ill, addicted to sugar and salt.

We also crave information more and more. From all sources.

And that’s why we’re surrounded by technologies everywhere.

But reading the newspaper, watching TV, checking out sites, email and social media, getting notifications on our phone and computer all the time… it’s just too much. Just think about how much of all this you actually need and wanted to know at the first place.

That’s just a small part of the abundance we live in today.

And the saddest thing is that it takes our time, energy and attention so much that we remain blind for the real things.

Those are the people we love, the things we love doing, having free time, meditating, relaxing, seeing the beauty around us, laughing and loving more, just going for a walk, reading and writing, eating healthy natural foods, having a purpose and so on.

And because of these two reasons – forgetting what really matters and focusing on stuff and activities that waste our time and potential – we live unconsciously.

And here’s the solution – eliminate the unnecessary.

Simplicity requires elimination so that the essential can be seen and enjoyed.

Here I’ve listed 40 things to get rid of.

You may consider some of them vitally important. But that’s not true.

We can easily live without that. It’s just that it will be hard to ditch it because we’re so used to it.

The first 20 items on the list are material. The next 20 are more spiritual and mental.

  1. TV set
  2. Smart Phone
  3. car
  4. most of your clothes
  5. most of your accessories
  6. dishwasher
  7. microwave
  8. coffee machine
  9. caffeine
  10. junk food
  11. grains
  12. processed foods
  13. sugar
  14. most of your kitchen utensils
  15. FB account
  16. other social media profiles
  17. ads
  18. medicines
  19. too many decorations at home
  20. regrets
  21. fake friends
  22. haste
  23. doubts
  24. negative thoughts
  25. disappointment
  26. guilt
  27. hatred
  28. comparing yourself to others
  29. jealousy
  30. the need to be always right
  31. fear
  32. insecurities
  33. anger
  34. worries
  35. too many desires
  36. complaining
  37. overthinking
  38. making choices because of someone else
  39. the need for attention
  40. the past

It’s your choice.

You can keep living the way you do, which is much easier because change often requires effort.

Or you can give elimination a try and embrace simplicity. It’s a sure way to find peace and harmony, to feel free and happy and have more space in your life.

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How to Stop Perfectionism from Ruining Your Business 25

How to Stop Perfectionism from Ruining Your Business

Perfection in your work is amazing – but perfectionism is a trait that can prevent you getting anything done.

If you find that you frequently miss deadlines, alienate your teammates, or develop stress symptoms as a result of your fear of less-than-perfect, it is likely a good idea to recalibrate your efforts.

This harmful breed of perfectionism is known as maladaptive perfectionism. It’s a problem because pushing yourself to reach unattainable results is a lose-lose situation.

Whether it is time limitations, restricted resources, or your own physical limits that hold you back, continuing to strive for perfect work when the conditions aren’t right will harm the work and will harm you.

But how can you temper your perfectionism without compromising your standards? As it happens, there are plenty of ways that have been scientifically demonstrated to be effective.

In Brazil, for example, researchers have shown that using visualization techniques to put your worries into perspective can help you to form a more realistic strategy to proceed. When you catch yourself stressing over a detail or panicking over a deadline, put a couple of minutes aside to sit down with a pen and paper and make a list of everything that’s going right with your project, and everything that’s going wrong. This way you will get a more objective idea of what you’ve achieved and what is still possible.

Perfectionism also has a social aspect.

This has become acuter with the rise of social media since we are bombarded with constant reminders of just how well our friends and rivals appear to be getting on. You may find you have a particular friend (or more than one!) who loses their social filter when they get online and has a tendency to leave unasked-for and negative ‘feedback’ on anything you share.

Social media is not reality. If you find yourself competing with the heavily-mediated expectations that come with life on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, then do yourself a favor and simply log off.

Even a one-month social media detox can help you get a little more of that precious ‘perspective’ that perfectionists so dearly need.

But perhaps the most valuable lesson at all is to learn to embrace flaws and mistakes.

The world is not perfect; even nature has its glitches and shortfalls. Deliberately integrated into your work, through clever design or just through learning from your mistakes, imperfection can make what you do more resonant and more beautiful.

The Japanese have a name for this: wabi-sabi. Learn to enjoy that which you cannot control, and the world will become a less intimidating place.

Sounds like a good place to start? You’ll find nine great tips on how to make the most of your perfectionism in this new visual guide from Saving Spot.