40 Things to Live Without to Have a More Minimal Lifestyle

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I’m thinking more and more about the so-called abundance in our lives. It does exist, but we tend to notice the wrong side of it.

What I mean is that we want to have more when it comes down to food, belongings, money, technologies, information, entertainment and so on.

And the moment we use or consume the certain thing, we feel good. But right after that, we feel emptier than before.

It’s because this stuff actually sucks the life out of us.

The food we eat is killing us. We don’t eat for energy or health anymore, but because it tastes good. And we barely think about the fact that probably 2/3 of the food in every supermarket is processed and made only to get us fat, ill, addicted to sugar and salt.

We also crave information more and more. From all sources.

And that’s why we’re surrounded by technologies everywhere.

But reading the newspaper, watching TV, checking out sites, email and social media, getting notifications on our phone and computer all the time… it’s just too much. Just think about how much of all this you actually need and wanted to know at the first place.

That’s just a small part of the abundance we live in today.

And the saddest thing is that it takes our time, energy and attention so much that we remain blind for the real things.

Those are the people we love, the things we love doing, having free time, meditating, relaxing, seeing the beauty around us, laughing and loving more, just going for a walk, reading and writing, eating healthy natural foods, having a purpose and so on.

And because of these two reasons – forgetting what really matters and focusing on stuff and activities that waste our time and potential – we live unconsciously.

And here’s the solution – eliminate the unnecessary.

Simplicity requires elimination so that the essential can be seen and enjoyed.

Here I’ve listed 40 things to get rid of.

You may consider some of them vitally important. But that’s not true.

We can easily live without that. It’s just that it will be hard to ditch it because we’re so used to it.

The first 20 items on the list are material. The next 20 are more spiritual and mental.

  1. TV set
  2. Smart Phone
  3. car
  4. most of your clothes
  5. most of your accessories
  6. dishwasher
  7. microwave
  8. coffee machine
  9. caffeine
  10. junk food
  11. grains
  12. processed foods
  13. sugar
  14. most of your kitchen utensils
  15. FB account
  16. other social media profiles
  17. ads
  18. medicines
  19. too many decorations at home
  20. regrets
  21. fake friends
  22. haste
  23. doubts
  24. negative thoughts
  25. disappointment
  26. guilt
  27. hatred
  28. comparing yourself to others
  29. jealousy
  30. the need to be always right
  31. fear
  32. insecurities
  33. anger
  34. worries
  35. too many desires
  36. complaining
  37. overthinking
  38. making choices because of someone else
  39. the need for attention
  40. the past

It’s your choice.

You can keep living the way you do, which is much easier because change often requires effort.

Or you can give elimination a try and embrace simplicity. It’s a sure way to find peace and harmony, to feel free and happy and have more space in your life.

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Meditation Mentality: Why Meditation Helps Heal

Meditation Mentality: Why Meditation Helps Heal

Meditating has been a form of healing and self-care for thousands of years.

Every culture has indulged in meditation in some way, although the best-known approach stems from India and is an integral part of yoga. Yoga, meaning union or to yolk, is actually one of three Vedic paths to nirvana (or escaping the cycle of re-incarnation).

Yoga, as it’s well known in the west, is usually asana, or postures. These asanas were designed so that ancient yogis could sit in seated meditation for hours (after all, you don’t want your legs cramping up while you’re trying to meditate).

However, meditating for hours is rarely recommended. Instead, practicing mindful awareness while limiting distractions for up to 30 minutes is best. Otherwise, it’s nearly guaranteed that most westerners will get distracted.

Why does meditation heal and how can we bring it into reasonable daily practice?

Meditation is the practice of looking inward and acknowledging thoughts as they approach (they will) and sending them away.

Some light distractions, such as counting mala beads, can help. Others prefer candle gazing.

There are countless tools to meditation, and one of the most common is pranayama (breath control) which can also be common in western yoga classes.

Pranayama also comes in a wide variety. One of the most simple is three-part breathing where you practice equal parts inhale, holding, and exhaling. All of these tools are designed to increase the odds of a successful meditation practice. Remember: the goal of meditation isn’t a blank mind. That’s rarely possible, especially for prolonged periods of time. The goal is to lessen stimulation and look inward.

Meditation can help lower blood pressure because it’s a calming practice. Since high blood pressure is related to heart disease, the top killer of women in the US, that’s reason enough alone to add it into your daily rituals. Also, bear in mind that meditation doesn’t need to last 30 minutes – even one minute of mindfulness (preferably in a seated position so you don’t slip into a nap) can be beneficial.

Many addicts say meditation was a key part of their recovery.

It can help redirect the mind as is known as a means of easing cravings and dangerous habits. It takes regular practice of any habit, good or bad, for it to form (some say 30 days or another arbitrary number, but it can vary by weeks based on the person).

When pursuing refuge recovery, meditation can be a powerful tool for coping and taking control of one’s life.

Meditation is a stress relief tool, which is critical as many westerners are highly stressed and working around the clock. This can lead to breakouts, anxiety and depression, and a host of mental and physical conditions.

Most people can’t “check out” of modern society, but implementing some ancient tools of self-care can be a great option. Find out what meditation can do for you, and keep in mind you may need to try a few strategies before finding the right fit.